Review article

BioMedicine

, 5:2

First online:

Open Access This content is freely available online to anyone, anywhere at any time.

The current progress and future prospects of personalized radiogenomic cancer study

  • Juhn-Cherng LiuAffiliated withTerry Fox Cancer Research Laboratory, China Medical University HospitalGraduate Institute of Clinical Medical Science, China Medical University
  • , Wu-Chung ShenAffiliated withTerry Fox Cancer Research Laboratory, China Medical University HospitalDepartment of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, China Medical University
  • , Tzu-Ching ShihAffiliated withTerry Fox Cancer Research Laboratory, China Medical University HospitalDepartment of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, China Medical University
  • , Chia-Wen TsaiAffiliated withTerry Fox Cancer Research Laboratory, China Medical University Hospital
  • , Wen-Shin ChangAffiliated withTerry Fox Cancer Research Laboratory, China Medical University Hospital
  • , Der-Yang ChoAffiliated withTerry Fox Cancer Research Laboratory, China Medical University Hospital
  • , Chang-Hai TsaiAffiliated withTerry Fox Cancer Research Laboratory, China Medical University Hospital
  • , Da-Tian BauAffiliated withTerry Fox Cancer Research Laboratory, China Medical University HospitalGraduate Institute of Clinical Medical Science, China Medical University Email author 

Abstract

During the last twenty years, mounting studies have supported the hypothesis that there is a genetic component that plays an important role in clinically observed variability in individual tissue/organ toxicity after radiotherapy. We propose the term “Personalized Radiogenomics” for the translational study of individual genetic variations that may associate with or contribute to the responses of tissues to radiation therapy used in the treatment of all types of cancer. The missions of personalized radiogenomic research are 1) to reveal the related genes, proteins, and biological pathways responsible for non-tumor or tumor tissue toxicity resulting from radiotherapy that could be targeted with radio-sensitizing and/or radio-protective agents, and 2) to identify specific genetic markers that can be used in risk prediction and evaluation models before and after clinical cancer surgery. For the members of the Terry Fox Cancer Research Lab in China Medical University and Hospital, the long-term goal is to develop SNP-based risk models that can be used to stratify patients to more precisely tailored radiotherapy protocols. Worldwide, the field has evolved over the last two decades in parallel with rapid advances in genetic and genomic technology, moving step by step from narrowly focused candidate gene studies to large-scale, collaborative genome-wide association studies. This article will summarize the candidate gene association studies published so far from the Terry Fox Cancer Research Lab as well as worldwide on the risk of radiation-related cancers and highlight some wholegenome association studies showing feasibility in fulfilling the dream of personalized radiogenomic cancer therapy.

Keywords:

Radiogenomics; Cancer study; Single nucleotide polymorphism; Genotype; Cancer therapy