Original article

BioMedicine

, 5:6

First online:

Open Access This content is freely available online to anyone, anywhere at any time.

The bacterial interactions in the nasopharynx of children receiving adenoidectomy

  • Hao-Xiang ChenAffiliated withSchool of Medicine and Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University
  • , Chih-Ho LaiAffiliated withSchool of Medicine and Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical UniversityDepartment of Nursing, Asia University
  • , Hui-Ying HsuAffiliated withSchool of Medicine and Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University
  • , Ju-Chun HuangAffiliated withSchool of Medicine and Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical UniversityDepartment of Laboratory Medicine, China Medical University Hospital
  • , Hua-Shan WuAffiliated withDepartment of Nursing, Asia University
  • , Mao-Wang HoAffiliated withDepartment of Internal Medicine, China Medical University Hospital
  • , Ming-Hsui TsaiAffiliated withGraduate Institute of Clinical Medical Science, China Medical UniversityDepartment of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, China Medical University Hospital
  • , Chia-Der LinAffiliated withSchool of Medicine and Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical UniversityGraduate Institute of Clinical Medical Science, China Medical UniversityDepartment of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, China Medical University Hospital Email author 

Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Haemophilus influenzae are the common pathogens that colonize in the nasopharynx of children. Polymicrobial interactions are thought to play an important role in different sites throughout the human body. However, there are currently very few studies that investigate the interactions between S. aureus, S. pneumoniae, and H. influenzae in the nasopharynx. We retrospectively analyzed the adenoid tissue culture from 269 children who received adenoidectomy. S. aureus, S. pneumoniae, and H. influenzae constituted the major microorganisms which were cultured from these adenoidectomies, at 23.4%, 21.6%, and 18.2%, respectively. S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae were the most prevalent in the preschool-aged children (3 < age ≤ 6), whereas S. aureus was more prevalent in infants and toddlers (age ≤ 3) and school-aged children (age > 6). Bacterial interference was found between S. aureus and S. pneumoniae and between S. aureus and H. influenzae, whereas there was an association found between S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae. The synergism and antagonism among these three species are investigated in the following paper, with the possible mechanisms involved in these interactions also discussed.

Keywords:

Adenoid; Bacterial interactions; Haemophilus influenzae; Staphylococcus aureus; Streptococcus pneumoniae