Article

BioMedicine

, 5:7

First online:

Open Access This content is freely available online to anyone, anywhere at any time.

Impact of cholesterol on disease progression

  • Chun-Jung LinAffiliated withDepartment of Urology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical CenterGraduate Institute of Clinical and Basic Medical Science, School of Medicine, China Medical University
  • , Cheng-Kuo LaiAffiliated withDepartment of Urology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical CenterGraduate Institute of Clinical and Basic Medical Science, School of Medicine, China Medical University
  • , Min-Chuan KaoAffiliated withGraduate Institute of Clinical and Basic Medical Science, School of Medicine, China Medical University
  • , Lii-Tzu WuAffiliated withGraduate Institute of Clinical and Basic Medical Science, School of Medicine, China Medical University
  • , U-Ging LoAffiliated withDepartment of Urology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
  • , Li-Chiung LinAffiliated withDepartment of Urology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical CenterDepartment of Life Sciences, National Chung Hsing University
  • , Yu-An ChenAffiliated withGraduate Institute of Clinical and Basic Medical Science, School of Medicine, China Medical University
  • , Ho LinAffiliated withDepartment of Life Sciences, National Chung Hsing University Email author 
  • , Jer-Tsong HsiehAffiliated withDepartment of Urology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical CenterGraduate Institute of Cancer Biology, China Medical University Email author 
    • , Chih-Ho LaiAffiliated withGraduate Institute of Clinical and Basic Medical Science, School of Medicine, China Medical UniversityDepartment of Microbiology and Immunology, Chang Gung UniversityDepartment of Nursing, Asia University Email author 
    • , Chia-Der LinAffiliated withGraduate Institute of Clinical and Basic Medical Science, School of Medicine, China Medical UniversityDepartment of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, China Medical University and Hospital Email author 

Abstract

Cholesterol-rich microdomains (also called lipid rafts), where platforms for signaling are provided and thought to be associated with microbe-induced pathogenesis and lead to cancer progression. After treatment of cells with cholesterol disrupting or usurping agents, raft-associated proteins and lipids can be dissociated, and this renders the cell structure nonfunctional and therefore mitigates disease severity. This review focuses on the role of cholesterol in disease progression including cancer development and infectious diseases. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of cholesterol in these diseases may provide insight into the development of novel strategies for controlling these diseases in clinical scenarios.

Keywords

Cancer development Cholesterol HMG-CoA reductase Infectious disease Lipid rafts